Pyometra

Pyometra Treatment

WHAT IS A PYOMETRA?

A pyometra is an infection inside the womb. Any unneutered dog is at risk of developing a pyometra, especially if they are over six years old. Hormonal changes during a season/heat put your dog at risk of a womb infection. Once the heat is over, the majority return to normal, but unfortunately, some dogs develop complications, which lead to an infection (pyometra). As a pyometra develops, the womb fills with pus. A pyometra can lead to blood poisoning, kidney failure, peritonitis and even death. 

We talk about a pyometra as either ‘open’ or ‘closed’. An open pyometra is when the womb entrance is open, meaning you are likely to see blood and pus coming from your dog’s vulva. A closed pyometra is when the womb entrance is shut; meaning you are unlikely to see any discharge. A closed pyometra is particularly dangerous because it is at risk of bursting.

It’s very rare, but occasionally a neutered dog will develop a specific type of pyometra called a stump pyometra – read more below. Hormone therapy used to treat an unwanted pregnancy increases the chance of a pyometra.

Pyometra Treatment
WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF A PYOMETRA?

Symptoms of a pyometra usually begin four to eight weeks after a season, and include:

  • Drinking more than usual
  • Vomiting
  • Pus leaking from vulva/vagina
  • Bloated abdomen (tummy)
  • Panting & weakness
  • Off food
  • Weeing more than usual
  • Collapse
WHAT IS THE TREATMENT FOR A PYOMETRA?

Treatment for a pyometra includes emergency surgery to remove the womb, a fluid drip and medication. The sooner a dog with a pyometra is treated, the better its chance of survival and recovery. Pyometra can cause death.

HOW CAN I PREVENT A PYOMETRA?

The most common time for a pyometra to develop is four to eight weeks after a heat/season. Neutering your dog will prevent a pyometra.
Pyometra is an emergency – contact us immediately for an emergency appointment if your dog is showing symptoms.

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